Důležité informace o Praze

 INFORMATION ABOUT PRAGUE

Climate

Geographically speaking, the Czech Republic is situated in a temperate zone, and there are four seasons of approximately all the same length. Winters are relatively mild (the average January temperature is -2 °C, 28,4 °F) and summers are not too hot (the average July temperature is 20°C, 68 °F), so you can travel to the Czech Republic at any time without being too concerned about the weather.


Electricity

AC electricity in the Czech Republic is 230 volts. The sockets are the same size as everywhere in the world. If you find a device with a different connector, adapters are very easily available.


Important telephone numbers

The most important emergency services have three-digit numbers which you should have with you at all times in case you should need them. These numbers can be called free of charge from mobiles even without a SIM card inserted.

112 – General emergency number

155 – Ambulance

158 – Police

156 – Municipal Police

150 – Fire brigade

Free phone numbers in the Czech Republic begin with 800. The numbers for directory enquiries are 1180 and 1181 (there is a charge for calls to these numbers).


Embassies and consulates

You can access assistance in difficult situations from your country’s embassy. Embassies are always located in the capital of the Czech Republic, Prague, and a complete list can be found on the Ministry for Foreign Affairs website (www.mzv.cz). Some countries do not have an embassy in the Czech Republic but are represented by a consulate (for instance Australia, Columbia, Malta, New Zealand and Sri Lanka).


Arriving to the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic became a member of the EU in 2004. There are different rules for citizens of other EU member countries than for tourists from other parts of the world. Everyone must carry ID at all times.

  • EU citizens: Citizens of EU member states need a passport or other ID document to enter the Czech Republic. The same is true for citizens of Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein, who enjoy free movement around the EEA (European Economic Area).
  • Non-EU citizens: Visitors from other countries require a passport with at least six months’ validity on the day of arrival and in some cases a visa. A list of states whose citizens require a visa to enter the Czech Republic can be found on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website (www.mzv.cz).
  • Schengen zone: From 21. 12. 2007 the Czech Republic enter the so-called Schengen Zone. This group of counties have come together to enable people to cross their borders without passport controls. Despite this, however, a valid passport or other ID will still have to be carried at all times.

Travelling with animals

In order to travel to the Czech Republic with an animal, all conditions set in the country from which the animal is being brought must be fulfilled, and further Czech rules must also be adhered to.

Requirements for travel with animals

  • passport (the so-called Pet Passport) or an export certificate from the relevant country, confirmed by a qualified vet
  • microchip or tattoo animal ID
  • rabies inoculation

For more information please visit the Czech State Veterinary Service website (www.svscr.cz).


Custom quotas and regulations

When bringing goods into the Czech Republic there are limits set on certain commodities. If a certain amount is exceeded, duty must be paid, and the importer is required to inform customs of the amount of the commodity he or she is bringing in to the country.

Items for personal use
The amount differs according to the country from which the goods are being brought in. Greater amounts are allowed to pass between EU countries than to and from third countries. For more information on the amount of goods that can be brought into the country, visit the Czech Customs Service website (www.cs.mfcr.cz)

The law
Law No. 353/2003 Sb., which deals with consumer taxes

Bringing currency into the country
When bringing in currency, travellers cheques or credit notes worth more than 15,000 Euros, the Czech Finance Ministry must be informed of the sum by filling in a form available at customs.

VAT refunds
Tourists from countries outside the EU may request VAT to be returned on purchases over 2,000 CZK. At the border they should produce a receipt bearing the retailer’s stamp and an export form and prove that they have the item with them to the customs officer. The money is returned to the customer on returning to the Czech Republic at the retailer or at Prague Ruzyně Airport through a special company. A purchaser loses the right to have VAT returned if he or she fails to do the above within six months of the purchase being made.


Public holidays

Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays mean most banks and offices will be closed. Ordinary shops also close on Sundays and public holidays, while supermarkets and shopping centers often stay open. It’s no problem on these days to visit a concert, exhibition, restaurant or bar.

  • Tip for visitors: Transport at weekends and on public holidays: public transport does not run as often on these days as on weekdays. There are also special limited timetables in operation during the summer holidays.

Public holidays
Czech Independence Day (1 January)
A day to mark the creation of an independent Czech Republic following the division of Czechoslovakia on 1 January 1993.

Liberation Day (8 May)
The day commemorates the liberation of the Czechoslovakia by the Allies in May 1945.

Day of the Slavic Apostles Cyril and Methodius (5 July)
The missionaries Cyril and Methodius are closely associated with the arrival of Christianity in this country and the first Slavic alphabet, Cyrillic (in the year 863).

Jan Hus Day (6 July)
The day marking the burning of Jan Hus at the stake (6. 7. 1415). Jan Hus was a reforming religious leader and the rector of Prague University.

Day of Czech Statehood (28 September)
The day Czech Prince Wenceslas was murdered in the year 935 by his own brother. Not long after his death he was declared a saint. On this day the Czechs celebrate their patron saint and symbol of Czech statehood and national identity.

Czechoslovak Independence Day (28 October)
A public holiday to mark the day Czechs and Slovaks established their own state in 1918-the most important national holiday of the year.

Freedom and Democracy Day (17 November)
The day Czechs remember the student struggles of 1939 and 1989 against the Nazi and communist regimes.

Other holidays
• New Year (1. January)
• Easter Monday (March/April, changes every year)
• Workers’ Day (1 May)
• Christmas Eve (24 December)
• Christmas Day (25 December)
• Feast of St Stephen (26 December)

School holidays
The main school holidays are in summer (July and August). Children are also off school around Christmas (usually from 23 December-until 3 January) and in spring (a whole week-differs according to location).

  • Tip for visitors: How to avoid travel difficulties: Remember when visiting the Czech Republic at the beginning and end of the main school holidays (around 1. 7. and 31. 8.) that there can be problems with the transport system across the country.

Business hours

Small shops
In small towns most shops are open Mon – Fri, from 8 or 9am until 6pm, and only in the morning on Saturdays. In big cities shops may stay open until 9pm. Only a few small shops have a lunch break, usually between 12 and 1pm.

Shopping centers
Shopping centers and department stores have longer opening hours, usually until 10pm even at weekends. Some large supermarkets are open 24 hours a day.

  • Tip for visitors: Should you find yourself in a place where there are no large shopping centers, there is sure to be a so-called „Večerka“ somewhere nearby, a small shop that stays open late and where you can buy basic foodstuffs.

Banks
Banks are only open Mon – Fri, usually from 9am until 5pm, though some days they may stay open until 7pm. Branch opening times differ from place to place. ATMs (cash machines) can be accessed 24 hours a day.

Offices
Offices in the Czech Republic have set opening days (Monday, Wednesday), and are usually open until 5pm at very least. On other days some offices are closed to the public.

  • Tip for visitors: Find out in advance whether an office is open or not. By doing so, you’ll avoid an unpleasant wait or pointless journey.

Post offices
Post Offices are usually open on weekdays from around 8am until 5pm and on Saturday mornings.

Restaurants
Restaurants, beer halls and cafes are normally open daily from 10am until 11pm. However, there are exceptions to this rule.

  • Tip for visitors: In the summer months eating and drinking outside is particularly popular. Outdoor seating at restaurants is usually open until 10pm when a period of quiet lasting until 6am comes into force.

Bars and clubs
Bars and clubs usually open in the afternoon. They normally stay open until 2am, in some cases until 3 or 5am. This depends on the number of guests at these times.

  • Tip for visitors: Hit the town on Friday or Saturday night when bars and discos are often open until the early hours.

Money

The official currency is the Czech crown and its abbreviation is (or CZK). There is no problem with paying in euros or by credit card. It is not recommended to use the exchange offices in the streets but rather in banks or hotels.

BANKNOTES OF THE CZECH CROWN

 

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{:}{:en}Důležité informace o Praze

Practical informations about Prague

Time Zones

The Czech Republic lies in the GMT +1 time zone, usually referred to as Central European Time (CET). The clocks are changed by one hour creating winter time and summer time (GTM + 2).

An interesting fact: The 24-hour clock is used in the Czech Republic. In the spoken language we would say we are going to meet at eight in the evening, but in official information this will always be 20:00.

Climate in Czech Republic

Geographically speaking, the Czech Republic is situated in a temperate zone, and there are four seasons of approximately all the same length. Winters are relatively mild (the average January temperature is -2 °C, 28,4 °F) and summers are not too hot (the average July temperature is 20 °C, 68 °F), so you can travel to the Czech Republic at any time without being too concerned about the weather.

Electricity in Czech Republic

Electricity AC in the Czech Republic is 230 volts. Neither current nor plug sizes are the same around the world. If you discover on arrival that an electrical device has a different plug to those used in this country, adapters are readily available.

Important telephone number

The most important emergency services have three-digit numbers which you should have with you at all times in case you should need them. These numbers can be called free of charge from mobiles even without a SIM card inserted

  • 112– General emergency number
    155 –Ambulance
    158 – Police
    156 – Municipal Police
    150 – Fire brigade

Free phone numbers in the Czech Republic begin with 800. The numbers for directory enquiries are 1180 and 1181 (there is a charge for calls to these numbers).

 

 

Embassies and consulates

You can access assistance in difficult situations from your country’s embassy. Embassies are always located in the capital of the Czech Republic, Prague, and a complete list can be found on the Ministry for Foreign Affairs website (www.mzv.cz). Some countries do not have an embassy in the Czech Republic but are represented by a consulate (for instance Australia, Columbia, Malta, New Zealand and Sri Lanka).

 

Arriving in the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic became a member of the EU in 2004. There are different rules for citizens of other EU member countries than for tourists from other parts of the world. Everyone must carry ID at all times.

EU citizens
Citizens of EU member states need a passport or other ID document to enter the Czech Republic. The same is true for citizens of Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein, who enjoy free movement around the EEA (European Economic Area).

Non-EU citizens
Visitors from other countries require a passport with at least six months’ validity on the day of arrival and in some cases a visa. A list of states whose citizens require a visa to enter the Czech Republic can be found on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website (www.mzv.cz).

Schengen zone
From 21. 12. 2007 the Czech Republic enter the so-called Schengen Zone. This group of counties have come together to enable people to cross their borders without passport controls. Despite this, however, a valid passport or other ID will still have to be carried at all times.

Travel with animals

In order to travel to the Czech Republic with an animal, all conditions set in the country from which the animal is being brought must be fulfilled, and further Czech rules must also be adhered to.

Requirements for travel with animals

  • passport (the so-called Pet Passport) or an export certificate from the relevant country, confirmed by a qualified vet
    • microchip or tattoo animal ID
    • rabies inoculation

For more information please visit the Czech State Veterinary Service website (www.svscr.cz).

 

 

 

Customs quotas and regulations

When bringing goods into the Czech Republic there are limits set on certain commodities. If a certain amount is exceeded, duty must be paid, and the importer is required to inform customs of the amount of the commodity he or she is bringing in to the country.

Items for personal use
The amount differs according to the country from which the goods are being brought in. Greater amounts are allowed to pass between EU countries than to and from third countries. For more information on the amount of goods that can be brought into the country, visit the Czech Customs Service website (www.cs.mfcr.cz)

The law
Law No. 353/2003 Sb., which deals with consumer taxes

Bringing currency into the country


When bringing in currency, travellers cheques or credit notes worth more than 15,000 Euros, the Czech Finance Ministry must be informed of the sum by filling in a form available at customs.

VAT refunds
Tourists from countries outside the EU may request VAT to be returned on purchases over 2,000 CZK. At the border they should produce a receipt bearing the retailer’s stamp and an export form and prove that they have the item with them to the customs officer. The money is returned to the customer on returning to the Czech Republic at the retailer or at Prague Ruzyně Airport through a special company. A purchaser loses the right to have VAT returned if he or she fails to do the above within six months of the purchase being made.

Business Hours

Small shops
In small towns most shops are open Mon – Fri, from 8 or 9am until 6pm, and only in the morning on Saturdays. In big cities shops may stay open until 9pm. Only a few small shops have a lunch break, usually between 12 and 1pm.

Shopping centers
Shopping centers and department stores have longer opening hours, usually until 10pm even at weekends. Some large supermarkets are open 24 hours a day.
Tips for visitors: Should you find yourself in a place where there are no large shopping centers, there is sure to be a so-called „Večerka“ somewhere nearby, a small shop that stays open late and where you can buy basic foodstuffs.

 

Banks
Banks are only open Mon – Fri, usually from 9am until 5pm, though some days they may stay open until 7pm. Branch opening times differ from place to place. ATMs (cash machines) can be accessed 24 hours a day.

Offices
Offices in the Czech Republic have set opening days. (Monday and Wednesday), and are usually open until 5pm at the very least. On other days some offices are closed to the publi    Tips for visitors: Find out in advance whether an office is open or not. By doing so, you’ll avoid an unpleasant wait or a pointless journey.

 

 

Post offices


Post Offices are usually open on weekdays from around 8am until 5pm and on Saturday mornings.

Restaurants
Restaurants, beer halls and cafes are normally open daily from 10am until 11pm. However, there are exceptions to this rule.
Tips for visitors: In the summer months eating and drinking outside is particularly popular. Outdoor seating at restaurants is usually open until 10pm when a period of quiet lasting until 6am comes into force.

Bars and clubs
Bars and clubs usually open in the afternoon. They normally stay open until 2am, in some cases until 3 or 5am. This depends on the number of guests at these times.
Tips for visitors: Hit the town on Friday or Saturday night when bars and discos are often open until the early hours.{:}

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